Living on SV Island Time

Adventures of Life on a Boat

Sailing to the Bahamas

In late March, Scott and I sailed Island Time from Port Everglades (Fort Lauderdale) to the Abaco Islands of the Bahamas. We were there nearly two months, through April and most of May.

My favorite parts? Here’s the top 5.

1. Good Friends. Four catamarans and one powerboat from Apalache Bay Yacht Club were in the Abacos this spring, including Frank and Pat Hankins aboard Zephyros, Steve and Mary Van Sciver aboard Soliton, Ivor and Lynn Groves aboard Gratitude, Scott and I aboard Island Time and Don Beekler and Beth Novinger aboard their powerboat. This is impressive since ABYC is a small club. Friends and family also came to visit, including John and Beth Hamilton, Mike and Angel Ganey, Jackie Werndli and Jon Robinson and Melinda Delpech. We had a great time seeing the sights, exploring the islands, sailing and meeting cruisers from various other places. Boaters share camraderie and a sense of adventure.

Scott and I with Frank and Pat Hankins after a hike on Munjack Cay.

Scott and I with Frank and Pat Hankins after a hike on Munjack Cay.

Mike and Angel Ganey climbing the rocks along the coast at Little Harbor.

Mike and Angel Ganey climbing the rocks along the coast at Little Harbor.

Scott and I with Steve and Mary Van Sciver and Frank and Pat Hankins at Nippers Bar and Grill on Great Guana Cay.

Scott and I with Steve and Mary Van Sciver and Frank and Pat Hankins at Nippers Bar and Grill on Great Guana Cay.

Scott and I with Jackie Werndli at Man O War Cay.Scott and I with Jackie Werndli at Man O War Cay.

Scott and I with Jackie Werndli at Man O War Cay.

The four of us on the bow celebrating the crossing back to Florida.

Scott and I with Jon Robinson and Melinda Delpech after the overnight trip back to Florida across the Gulf Stream.

2. Great scenery. The Abacos are beautiful. Here’s a sample of photos.

Scott holds up one of three 28-inch mutton snappers caught on the trip.

Scott holds up one of three 28-inch mutton snappers caught on the trip.

Green sea turtle at rest

Scott points at a green sea turtle at rest under a branch near Little Harbor.

Scott snorkeling to find a queen conch.

Scott finds a queen conch near Little Harbor.

Coral reef at Fowl Cay Preserve.

The coral reef at Fowl Cay Preserve. Fish were plentiful with barracuda, angel fish, tangs and a variety of other fish.

Lighthouse at Hope Town

The Hope Town lighthouse claims to be the last manned kerosene burning lamp in the world.

View from the lighthouse

View of the harbor and Atlantic Ocean from the top of the Hope Town Lighthouse

3. Good wind. Most days were sunny with temperatures in the 80s and wind between 10 and 20 knots. That’s perfect sailing weather. Most night temperatures fell in the low 70s with light wind, making it comfortable to sleep without air conditioning since we were at anchor or on a mooring ball for most nights.

Island Time under sail on turquoise waters.

Island Time under sail on turquoise waters.

4. Tradition. It’s a tradition among boaters to blow a conch horn at sunset. An enterprising young Bahamian man sold us a conch horn for $5 in West End. I never got the hang of it despite Scott’s efforts to teach me. I will keep practicing. Angel Ganey played the trombone in high school and she’s a pro at blowing the conch horn. See the video.

5. My favorite. Scott can no longer say he has never been to the Bahamas.

Scott and I at Tahiti Beach on Elbow Cay.

Scott and I at Tahiti Beach on Elbow Cay.

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Newly Salted Interview

4 Comments

  1. Donna Watkins

    Wish we had been there with you but you have me all hyped up to go back now. We are loving our land vacation but still pining away for that gorgeous water. Glad you are safely across the pond.

  2. Thank you for the update. It sounds like a grand adventure. I’m glad to hear that Jackie joined you for some of the trip.

    What’s next? We’re in Banff National Park and it’s gorgeous. Safe travels.

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